Paul Moloney and Justin Podur talk ‘The Therapy Industry: The Irresistible Rise of the Talking Cure and Why it Doesn’t Work’ | The Ossington Circle, episode 4

Justin Podur, author of Haiti’s New Dictatorship (Pluto, 2012) and host of the progressive internet talk show, The Ossington Circle, has interviewed Paul Moloney about his new book.

The Therapy Industry: The Irresistible Rise of the Talking Cure and Why It Doesn’t Work (Pluto, 2013) makes the bold claim that many of our problems cannot be resolved merely through ‘talk’, advocating instead what he calls social-materialist psychology; a psychology that sees social relations and the external world as the most important determinants of mental health.

We’ve embedded the video of the interview below. You can find out more about Paul’s book on the Pluto website, here.

 

5 thoughts on “Paul Moloney and Justin Podur talk ‘The Therapy Industry: The Irresistible Rise of the Talking Cure and Why it Doesn’t Work’ | The Ossington Circle, episode 4

  1. Many talking therapies take into consideration social relations and the external world, it’s called the biopsychosocial model, it is the basis of the majority if not all western talking therapies. His critique that “talking therapies suggest that human beings are unhappy because they lack sufficient insight, motivation, analysis, or strategies to adapt to the environment”, might be true of cognitive behavioral therapy, which focuses on mastering clarity and intellect, but it completely neglects modern psychiatry, or contemporary Dialectical Behavioral Therapy which specifically incorporates things to address interpersonal relations, emotion regulation, mindfulness (breathing excercises), and is not specifically about “Figuring out it by talking to your therapist”.

    most talking therapies now a days believe that mental illness is a maladaptive coping mechanism, for the most part, isn’t this exactly the kind of social-materialist psychology he’s fighting for?

    people go to therapy because they are bipolar, depressed, or borderline personality disorder. neither of these are caused by society, environment, lack of education.

    also MOST people who go to talking therapies are from developed worlds, if mental illness is caused by social inequality, why aren’t 3rd world countries more depressed than we are?

  2. Arguably a part of mental illness including depression and anxiety is directly related to social/emotional poverty which is shaped by the political economy, technology and a gamut of social conditions which are filtered through housing, debt, consumerism and the neo-liberal model of what it is to be a human. So called third world countries often have much greater connection/community much less financially mediated individualism. A friend rode from the south coast to West Africa to work in a school. He noted that the further south he rode the more convivial, friendly, relaxed and hospitable people became. They had greater social connection ie less social poverty and did not experience the world through mortgages, rental debt, stressful jobs and obsessive consumerism. Sure this is a partial picture but I think its important to explore.

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