9/11 perspectives – Chomsky, Shahzad, Mohamedou

Palgrave Macmillan in the US has just gone live with it’s excellent online ‘9/11 forum’ which features authoritative and highly respected authors writing on themes related to the 9/11 attacks, including Syed Saleem Shahzad, author of Inside Al-Qaeda and the Taliban: Beyond Bin Laden and 9/11 and Mohammad-Mahmoud Ould Mohamedou, author of Understanding Al Qaeda: Changing War and Global Politics.

The site includes free access to articles related to 9/11 in Palgrave Journals and will be regularly updated with new commentary and analysis.

Noam Chomsky, author of Power and Terror: Conflict, Hegemony, and the Rule of Force, has also just written a major article for the Boston Review in which he compares the ‘first’ and ‘second’ 9/11:

The crimes could have been even worse. Suppose that Flight 93, downed by courageous passengers in Pennsylvania, had bombed the White House, killing the president. Suppose that the perpetrators of the crime planned to, and did, impose a military dictatorship that killed thousands and tortured tens of thousands. Suppose the new dictatorship established, with the support of the criminals, an international terror center that helped impose similar torture-and-terror states elsewhere, and, as icing on the cake, brought in a team of economists—call them “the Kandahar boys”—who quickly drove the economy into one of the worst depressions in its history. That, plainly, would have been a lot worse than 9/11.

As we all should know, this is not a thought experiment. It happened. I am, of course, referring to what in Latin America is often called “the first 9/11”: September 11, 1973, when the United States succeeded in its intensive efforts to overthrow the democratic government of Salvador Allende in Chile with a military coup that placed General Pinochet’s ghastly regime in office. The dictatorship then installed the Chicago Boys—economists trained at the University of Chicago—to reshape Chile’s economy. Consider the economic destruction, the torture and kidnappings, and multiply the numbers killed by 25 to yield per capita equivalents, and you will see just how much more devastating the first 9/11 was.

Visit the Boston Review to read the article in full.

Power and Terror

Conflict, Hegemony, and the Rule of Force

Noam Chomsky

Noam Chomsky analyses US foreign policy in the Middle East in the 10 years since 9/11. Includes 3 previously unpublished essays.

“Judged in terms of the power, range, novelty, and influence of his thought, Noam Chomsky is arguably the most important intellectual alive.” – The New York Times

“On the one hand we have the established media, the respectable community of foreign affairs analysts, the government – on the other, Noam Chomsky.” – The Nation

£12.99 only £11.50 on the Pluto site

Inside Al-Qaeda and the Taliban

Beyond Bin Laden and 9/11

Syed Saleem Shahzad

A unique insight into the post-Osama bin Laden generation of Al-Qaeda and Taliban leaders from a journalist who interviewed many of them.

“This is a disturbing book. … Shahzad considers the strategies of al-Qaeda and other radical Islamist movements in terms that are not often heard.” – The Times

“Buy Shahzad’s book. It tells us what the Pakistani government, whose corruption and brutality Shahzad died to expose, does not want us to know.” – Charles Glass

£17.99 only £16.00 on the Pluto site

Understanding Al Qaeda – Second Edition

Changing War and Global Politics

Mohammad-Mahmoud Ould Mohamedou

Updated edition of the controversial book which argues that the only way to defeat Al Qaeda it is to engage with its arguments in a serious way.

“Mohamedou is a top-notch academic. In today’s world, you can’t afford to miss this book.” – Tim Sebastian, award-winning former BBC foreign correspondent and presenter of HARDtalk

“Mohammad Mohamedou has written a political analysis which provides a much-needed secular understanding of Al Qaeda as one among several organised forces in a rapidly changing international arena. Unlike most writers on the subject who tend to be mesmerised by Al Qaeda’s religious discourse, Mohamedou insists on understanding the changing significance of the discourse against a historical backdrop of actions and events.” – Mahmood Mamdani, Herbert Lehman Professor of Government, Columbia University

£16.99 only £15.00 on the Pluto site

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